Website: Banishing Bullying Behaviors

Our site is designed to be informative and open up conversations with people who are interested in helping children by banishing bullying behavior.

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Article: The rocking chair boy

Gerry would get up and begin pacing in the classroom. His teacher in his old school was frustrated with the child. She spent lots of time trying to get Gerry to sit down during instruction. He even had a FBA (functional behavior plan) addressing that “problem.” Gerry’s real challenge was that he had ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) which included extreme sensory issues. He also had limited verbal communication. This is a story about how a teacher figured out what to do to include a student with ASD into her classroom and get him to learn and do his work.

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Article: Autism after high school

Melanie Tyner-Wilson is facing one of her toughest battles yet. She wants nothing more than to help her son Jay Tyner-Wilson, who is a person with autism, land his first real job.

Public school provided opportunities for Jay to gain volunteer vocational experience. There, he discovered he enjoyed working with animals—and school offered a repetitive, structured and routine environment. But Jay is 21 years old now and aged out of the school system in May.
“The challenge is now finding a job,” says his mother. “That’s the golden ticket that I’m trying to figure out.”

Jay did not qualify for an official high school diploma, so the path to college or career is a tricky one. Melanie laments that many people with disabilities end up living in poverty unless they have families and other resources that can save and plan for them. With an ever-increasing number of students on the autism spectrum coming through the school pipeline, questions abound as to what they can do to build a life for themselves beyond school.

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Article: An autistic child’s (artificially intelligent) best friend

How Siri, Apple’s “intelligent personal assistant” on the iPhone, is seemingly changing the interface of childhood imaginary friends

This article is about Siri, Apple’s new personal assistant and how Siri became friends with an individual with an ASD. How Siri is able to have a conversation with someone and help them with their computer needs as well as solve a problem with friendship as well.

View the Article – An autistic child’s (artificially intelligent) best friend

Article: Flying under the radar: Girls and Women with Aspergers Syndrome

Aspergers Syndrome appears to be more common among boys than girls, when the research is reviewed. However, recent awareness of genetic differences between males and females, and the diagnostic criteria largely based on the characteristics of males, are currently thought to be responsible for females being less likely to be identified. Attwood (2000), Ehlers and Gillberg (1993) and Wing (1981) all acknowledge that many girls and women with Aspergers Syndrome are never referred for assessment and diagnosis for AS, or are misdiagnosed, and are therefore missed from statistics and research. Many girls and women do not meet diagnostic criteria, as the criteria are based on the behavioural phenotype of boys. There exists a critical need for diagnostic criteria to reflect the female phenotype.

View the Article – Flying under the radar: Girls and Women with Aspergers Syndrome

Article: Huffington Post: The SPECTRUM Alert: 8 Steps Schools Can Take to Prevent Autism-Elopement Tragedy

Most school districts do not have an elopement protocol. I can assert this as both a public-school educator of 18 years and as an autism-parent advocate. If you Google “school autism elopement plan,” the first one you’ll come up with is the original version of this one on my own blog. Schools typically address autistic elopement only in the context of a specific child in an IEP meeting — if they address it at all. And it’s not because they can’t afford to make such a plan; an effective protocol like the one I will propose here is mostly free. The reason schools don’t have one is simple: They don’t realize they need it.

View the Article – Huffington Post: The SPECTRUM Alert: 8 Steps Schools Can Take to Prevent Autism-Elopement Tragedy

Article: Health Professionals Network: The Changing Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder: What They Mean for Practice

An estimate of the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) recently published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) concluded that rates of ASDs are roughly 30% higher than previous estimates. These new data (from 2010) put the figure at 1 in 68 children age 8 years (or 14.7 per 1000), compared with the 2012 published estimate of 1 in 88 children (11.3 per 1000).

View the Article – Health Professionals Network: The Changing Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder: What They Mean for Practice

Article: YaleNews: Siblings of children with autism can show signs at 18 months

About 20% of younger siblings of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) will develop the condition by age 3. A new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers has found that 57% of these younger siblings who later develop the condition already showed symptoms at age 18 months.

View the Article – YaleNews: Siblings of children with autism can show signs at 18 months

Website: Think Beyond the Label

Think Beyond the Label delivers information, outreach and resources to businesses, job seekers and the public workforce system to ensure greater recruiting and hiring opportunities for job candidates with disabilities. Through its website, it offers a jobs portal where job seekers can connect with potential employers and shares success stories.

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Guide: The Boggs Center on Developmental Disabilities: Being a Healthy Adult: How to Advocate for Your Health and Health Care

This guide focuses on transition in a healthcare context. It provides information and tools for self-advocates to assist them in their health care decisions.

View the Guide – The Boggs Center on Developmental Disabilities: Being a Healthy Adult: How to Advocate for Your Health and Health Care