Website: The Arc’s National Center on Criminal Justice & Disability

The Arc’s National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability (NCCJD), funded by the U.S. Department of Justice, is the first national effort of its kind to bring together both victim and suspect/ offender issues involving people with I/DD under one roof. The NCCJD’s products and services include: training and technical assistance (including webinars); an on-line resource library; white papers, literature reviews and reports to promote identification and evaluation support of promising practices.

View the Website – The Arc’s National Center on Criminal Justice & Disability

Webpage: The Autism Society of Maine: Facts for Prosecutors

The Autism Society of Maine is working to ensure that police departments and other responders understand and are best equipped to assist and interact with individuals with autism during times of emergencies. This webpage contains points that prosecutors are encouraged to consider when it comes to certain areas such as confessions, criminal intent, trials, sentencing and more.

View the Webpage – The Autism Society of Maine: Facts for Prosecutors

Webpage: Employment & Training Resources: Employer Resources – Hiring People with Disabilities

This webpage offers resources to employers to assist in answering questions and providing practical information that can facilitate efforts to develop a diversified workforce. Topics covered include benefits and opportunities for employers, accommodations, financial and tax incentives, and recruiting, hiring and employing individuals with disabilities.

View the Webpage – Employment & Training Resources: Employer Resources – Hiring People with Disabilities

Report: Bureau of Justice Statistics: Crime Against Persons with Disabilities, 2009-2012 – Statistical Tables

In this report, disabilities are classified according to six limitations: hearing, vision, cognitive, ambulatory, self-care, and independent living. Among persons with disabilities, those with cognitive disabilities experienced the highest rate of violent victimization (63 per 1,000). Violent crime against persons with disabilities was nearly three times higher than the rate for persons without disabilities. The rate of serious violent crime—rape or other sexual assault, robbery and aggravated assault—against persons with disabilities was nearly four times higher than that for persons without disabilities in 2012.

View the Report – Bureau of Justice Statistics: Crime Against Persons with Disabilities, 2009-2012 – Statistical Tables

Webpage: U.S. Fire Adminstration: Fire Safety for People with Disabilities

This webpage contains fire safety tips that the United States Fire Administration encourages people with disabilities and their caregivers to read and use to help protect themselves and their homes from fire.

View the Website – U.S. Fire Adminstration: Fire Safety for People with Disabilities

Video: The Rhythm Tree: Music Therapy and Autism

In this video, Ryan Judd, a board certified music therapist, presents a social story that can be used to teach individuals with autism social skills such as active listening and respecting personal space.

View the Video – The Rhythm Tree: Music Therapy and Autism

Guide: Vanderbilt Kennedy Center: Taking the Work Out of Blood Work: Helping Your Child with an Autism Spectrum Disorder – A Parent’s Guide

The Vanderbilt Kennedy Center has joined with Autism Speaks to create a resource for physicians and parents of children with autism to better prepare for blood draws and other routine medical procedures. This toolkit and the companion: Taking the Work Out of Blood Work: Helping Your Patient with an Autism Spectrum Disorder – A Provider’s Guide,” provides evidence-based behavioral strategies for parents and health care professionals that can be used before and during the medical visit and procedure.

View the Guide – Vanderbilt Kennedy Center: Taking the Work Out of Blood Work: Helping Your Child with an Autism Spectrum Disorder – A Parent’s Guide

Guide: TU Collaborative on Community Inclusion: A Practical Guide for People with Disabilities Who Want to Go to College

This guide, produced by Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion of Individuals with Psychiatric Disabilities, provides information and resources to help people with limited knowledge of educational opportunities after high school secure the resources and support networks they need to give them the best chance for success.  It discusses various topics including: picking the right school, planning for the type of degree that one wants to pursue, paying for school and securing additional funding, managing one’s disability on campus and more.

View the Guide – TU Collaborative on Community Inclusion: A Practical Guide for People with Disabilities Who Want to Go to College

Guide: NCLD-Youth: Internships: The On-Ramp to Employment

This guide, developed by the National Consortium on Leadership and Disability for Youth, provides information and tools to help youth with disabilities learn the importance of participating in an internship. It offers tips and tools including sample resume and cover letters to help individuals obtain internships.

View the Guide – NCLD-Youth: Internships: The On-Ramp to Employment

Article: Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center (SARRC): Opening Doors: A Discussion of Residential Options for Adults Living with Autism and Related Disorders

The study focuses on the residential concerns of adults living with autism and related disorders and is designed to advance the development of replicable residential models that offer quality, affordable housing options within the fabric of their communities. It also addresses current and projected demand for life-long living options that support the segment of individuals with autism spectrum and related disorders unable to live on their own.

View the Article – Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center (SARRC): Opening Doors: A Discussion of Residential Options for Adults Living with Autism and Related Disorders